EnXtra® Alpinia Galanga

ALPINIA GALANGA COMMON NAME

Greater Galangal | Thai Ginger | Siamese Ginger

TOP BENEFITS OF ALPINIA GALANGA

  • Sharpens alertness and focus*
  • Amplifies caffeine’s nootropic benefits*
  • Supports brain and cognitive function*

WHAT IS ALPINIA GALANGA?

Alpinia galanga is native to Southeast Asia, where it’s used as a food and herb.[1]. It is part of the ginger family, and, similar to ginger, the rhizome, or creeping rootstalk is what’s used. The rhizome has a pungent smell reminiscent of black pepper and pine. The similarity in appearance to the ginger rhizome has led to one of its common names, Thai ginger. In some traditional medical systems, it is regarded as being superior to ginger. EnXtra® is a clinically studied and standardized Alpinia galanga rhizome extract. In humans studies, EnXtra® has been synergistic with caffeine. In a clinical study, supplementation with EnXtra® supported alertness and focus It’s clinically proven to improve alertness and focus for up to 5 hours with and without caffeine. EnXtra® can be used as a replacement for caffeine or used with caffeine to prevent crash and prolong caffeine’s nootropic benefits.[2]

NEUROHACKER’S ALPINIA GALANGA SOURCING

EnXtra® has been used in human clinical studies, where it has enhanced alertness and focus, and amplified the nootropic response to caffeine.

EnXtra® is created by Enovate Biolife, and is standardized for total polyphenols (not less than [NLT] 3%), flavanoids (NLT 4%), polysaccharides (NLT 20%) and pyrocatecollic type tannins (NLT 1%). 

EnXtra® is responsibly sourced. It is cultivated without pesticides in hilly terrain and hand picked to ensure optimum potency. It is DNA authenticated to ensure botanical identification.

EnXtra® is GRAS affirmed, non-GMO, gluten-free, vegan, Kosher certified and Halal compliant.

Grown in India.

EnXtra® is a registered trademark of Enovate Bioscience. 

ALPINIA GALANGA DOSING PRINCIPLES AND RATIONALE

We consider Alpinia galanga to be in the adaptogenic herb category; following hormetic dosing principles (see Neurohacker Dosing Principles) with a high likelihood of having a hormetic range (i.e., a dosing range below and above which results could be poorer). We have selected to dose this at an amount that is consistent with the studied amount in the human clinical studies.*

ALPINIA GALANGA KEY MECHANISMS

Cognitive function

  • Supports mental alertness [2]
  • Supports attention [3]
  • Supports memory [4,5]

Brain function

  • Neuroprotective effects [4–6]
  • CNS stimulant activity [7]
  • Supports locomotor activity and motor coordination [7]
  • Downregulates acetylcholinesterase (AChE) levels/activity in the brain [4,5]
  • Downregulates monoamine oxidase (MAO) A and B levels/activity in the brain [5]

Antioxidant defenses

  • Upregulates antioxidant enzymes in the brain (superoxide dismutase [SOD], catalase [CAT], glutathione peroxidase [GPx]) [4–6,8]
  • Replenishes glutathione (GSH) levels [8]
  • Downregulates lipid peroxidation [6,8]

Other effects

  • Supports healthy cardiometabolic parameters [8,9]
  • Immunostimulant activity [10]

 Synergies

  • Caffeine — supports sustained attention [2]


REFERENCES 

[1]D. Kaushik, J. Yadav, P. Kaushik, D. Sacher, R. Rani, Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Xue Bao 9 (2011) 1061–1065.
[2]S. Srivastava, M. Mennemeier, S. Pimple, J. Am. Coll. Nutr. 36 (2017) 631–639.
[3]S. Shalini Srivastava, BAOJN 3 (2017) 1–10.
[4]J.C. Hanish Singh, V. Alagarsamy, P.V. Diwan, S. Sathesh Kumar, J.C. Nisha, Y. Narsimha Reddy, J. Ethnopharmacol. 138 (2011) 85–91.
[5]J.C. Hanish Singh, V. Alagarsamy, S. Sathesh Kumar, Y. Narsimha Reddy, Phytother. Res. 25 (2011) 1061–1067.
[6]R. Mundugaru, S. Sivanesan, P. Udaykumar, V. Dj, S.N. Prabhu, B. Ravishankar, IJPER 52 (2018) s77–s85.
[7]S. Saha, S. Banerjee, Indian J. Exp. Biol. 51 (2013) 828–832.
[8]P. Kaushik, D. Kaushik, J. Yadav, P. Pahwa, Pak. J. Biol. Sci. 16 (2013) 804–811.
[9]R.K. Verma, G. Mishra, P. Singh, K.K. Jha, R.L. Khosa, Ayu 36 (2015) 91–95.
[10]D. Bendjeddou, K. Lalaoui, D. Satta, J. Ethnopharmacol. 88 (2003) 155–160.