Gamma-Oryzanol

GAMMA-ORYZANOL COMMON NAME

γ-Oryzanol | Ferulic Acids

TOP BENEFITS OF GAMMA-ORYZANOL

Supports antioxidant defenses*
Supports menopause*
Supports mood*
Supports nervous system*
Supports cognitive function*

WHAT IS GAMMA-ORYZANOL?

Gamma-oryzanol (γ-oryzanol) is a mixture of lipid molecules called steryl ferulates. Like many secondary metabolites in plants, and similar to tocopherols which also naturally occur in the oils of seeds, γ-oryzanol is considered to be an antioxidant. The best food source is rice bran and germ—γ-oryzanol gets its name from the botanical name for rice, Oryza sativa. γ-oryzanol has been sold in Japan since 1962, and most of the human studies on it have been done in Japan and published in non-English papers. These studies have focused primarily on supporting aspects of menopause, mood, nervous system, and heart health. Animal studies have suggested cognitive, mood, stress, immune and sleep support functions.

NEUROHACKER’S GAMMA-ORYZANOL SOURCING

γ-Oryzanol is sourced from rice bran oil which goes through several extraction steps resulting in a finished product that contains not less than 97% γ-Oryzanol.

γ-Oryzanol is Non-GMO and Vegan.

GAMMA-ORYZANOL DOSING PRINCIPLES AND RATIONALE

One of our dosing principles is to determine whether there is a dosing range, in which many of the benefits occur and above which there appears to be diminishing returns (i.e., a threshold), and to provide a dose within this threshold range (see Neurohacker Dosing Principles ). We consider γ-oryzanol to be one of these threshold compounds. Very modest amounts of γ-oryzanol—10 to 50 mg a day—have been needed to produce a functional benefit in some of the human studies, so we will typically use a dose within this range. In parts of the world where rice bran oil is used or rice bran is consumed, it is a naturally occurring part of the diet; however, there would be a negligible amount found in a typical western diet. The modest dose of γ-oryzanol supplied can be thought of as augmenting the intake of an ingredient that’s not found in a meaningful amount in many people’s diets.

GAMMA-ORYZANOL KEY MECHANISMS

Brain function
Supports learning and memory[1–4]
Supports histaminergic neurotransmission[5,6]
Supports brain mitochondrial function[3,7,8]
Supports adrenergic signaling[9–11]
Supports serotonin signaling[9–11]
Supports synaptic plasticity[1]
Supports brain mitochondrial function and energy metabolism[1]
Supports neuronal antioxidant defenses[1,10,12–14]
Supports neuroprotection functions[13,15–17]

Stress and sleep
Supports healthy behavioral and physiological responses to stress[3,9,14,18–22]
Supports non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep[5,6]

Antioxidant defenses
Supports antioxidant defenses (SOD, GPx)[1,14,17,23–25]
Supports Nrf2 signaling[24]
Supports phase II antioxidant enzymes (HO-1, NQO1)[2,21,24]
Counters ROS production and oxidative stress[14,17]

Healthy aging and longevity
Supports healthy cardiovascular function[23,26,27]
Supports healthy kidney function[28–30]
Supports healthy metabolic function[30–33]
Supports muscle strength[34]
Supports immune performance[35]
Supports mitochondrial function and biogenesis[3,7,17]
Supports autophagy[15,36]


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