Lactococcus lactis strain Plasma (heat killed)

COMMON NAME

LC Plasma | Heat-killed Lactococcus lactis JCM 5805

TOP BENEFITS OF LACTOCOCCUS LACTIS STRAIN PLASMA (HEAT KILLED)

  • Supports general immune health*
  • Supports healthy immune function after intense exercise*
  • Supports upper respiratory tract health*
  • Supports mucosal immune health*

WHAT IS  LACTOCOCCUS LACTIS STRAIN PLASMA (HEAT KILLED)?

Lactococcus lactis strain Plasma (heat killed) is a clinically researched probiotic developed by Kirin Holdings Co, Ltd. In research studies, it is sometimes called LC-Plasma and other times referred to as heat-killed Lactococcus lactis JCM 5805. The first part (e.g. Lactococcus) is the genus. The second part (e.g. lactis) is the species. And the third part (e.g. “Plasma” or “JCM 5805”) is the strain. It is this special strain of L. lactis that supports the immune system in a unique way. Lactococcus lactis strain Plasma (heat-killed) is a paraprobiotic and an immunobiotic. A paraprobiotic is the subcategory of probiotics that have been heat-treated. Unlike a live probiotic, which requires refrigeration, a paraprobiotic is inactivated and does not require refrigeration. Immunobiotics are a subset of probiotics that support a healthy immune system. L. lactis strain Plasma, because it is inactivated, has the advantages of not requiring refrigeration, and has an immunobiotic action that is not found in other lactic acid bacteria (whether alive or inactivated). The immune system is made up of many interacting white blood cells (i.e., immune cells). L. lactis strain Plasma is unique and thus named because it supports a rare immune cell type called Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). pDCs have been described as a leader of the immune system because they direct and organize many other immune cells. This leadership role has resulted in Lactococcus lactis strain Plasma (heat-killed) supporting healthy working days, and immunity during periods of high-intensity exercise, in human studies.

NEUROHACKER’S  LACTOCOCCUS LACTIS STRAIN PLASMA (HEAT KILLED) SOURCING

Lactococcus lactis strain Plasma (heat-killed) is backed by strong science; it has been used in nine human clinical studies.

Lactococcus lactis strain Plasma (heat-killed) is produced in Japan from the plasma strain (i.e., strain JCM 5805) using an innovative fermentation process.

Lactococcus lactis strain Plasma (heat-killed) is GRAS, non-allergenic, non-GMO, gluten-free, and vegan.

Lactococcus lactis strain Plasma is an ingredient developed by Kirin Holdings Co, Ltd.

LACTOCOCCUS LACTIS STRAIN PLASMA (HEAT KILLED) DOSING PRINCIPLES AND RATIONALE

The clinically studied adult dose, and the adult dose recommended by the developer, is 50 mg a day. We supply a dose of Lactococcus lactis strain Plasma (heat-killed) that is the clinically studied amount in order to be consistent with human research.

LACTOCOCCUS LACTIS STRAIN PLASMA (HEAT KILLED) KEY MECHANISMS

Immune function

  • Supports general immune health[1–4]
  • Supports post-exercise immunity[5,6]
  • Supports innate immunity[2,4,5,7–10]
  • Supports adaptive immunity[4,11,12]
  • Supports GI mucosal immunity[4,13]
  • Supports skin mucosal immunity[14]
  • Supports cellular intrinsic immune defenses[13,15]
  • Supports healthy plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC) function[2,5,7–11,13,14,16,17]
  • Supports healthy natural killer cell function[10]
  • Supports healthy neutrophil function[4]
  • Supports healthy T cell function[11,12]
  • Supports healthy B cell function[4,11]

Exercise 

  • May help support recovery from fatigue produced by high-intensity exercise[5]

Healthy aging

  • Supports healthspan (mice)[16]
  • Supports against cellular senescence[12,16]

REFERENCES
[1] T. Sugimura, H. Takahashi, K. Jounai, K. Ohshio, M. Kanayama, K. Tazumi, Y. Tanihata, Y. Miura, D. Fujiwara, N. Yamamoto, Br. J. Nutr. 114 (2015) 727–733.
[2] T. Shibata, M. Kanayama, M. Haida, S. Fujimoto, T. Oroguchi, K. Sata, N. Mita, T. Kutsuzawa, M. Ikeuchi, M. Kondo, K. Naito, M. Tsuda, Y. Nishizaki, N. Ishii, J. Funct. Foods 24 (2016) 492–500.
[3] K. Sakata, Y. Sasaki, K. Jounai, T. Fujii, D. Fujiwara, Health 09 (2017) 756–762.
[4] T. Fujii, K. Jounai, A. Horie, H. Takahashi, H. Suzuki, K. Ohshio, D. Fujiwara, N. Yamamoto, J. Funct. Foods 35 (2017) 513–521.
[5] Y. Komano, K. Shimada, H. Naito, K. Fukao, Y. Ishihara, T. Fujii, T. Kokubo, H. Daida, J. Int. Soc. Sports Nutr. 15 (2018) 39.
[6] T. Kokubo, Y. Komano, R. Tsuji, D. Fujiwara, T. Fujii, O. Kanauchi, International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism (2019) 1–5.
[7] T. Sugimura, K. Jounai, K. Ohshio, T. Tanaka, M. Suwa, D. Fujiwara, Clin. Immunol. 149 (2013) 509–518.
[8] K. Jounai, K. Ikado, T. Sugimura, Y. Ano, J. Braun, D. Fujiwara, PLoS One 7 (2012) e32588.
[9] K. Jounai, T. Sugimura, K. Ohshio, D. Fujiwara, PLoS One 10 (2015) e0119055.
[10] H. Suzuki, K. Ohshio, D. Fujiwara, Biosci. Biotechnol. Biochem. 80 (2016) 798–800.
[11] H. Suzuki, K. Jounai, K. Ohshio, T. Fujii, D. Fujiwara, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 503 (2018) 1315–1321.
[12] R. Tsuji, Y. Komano, K. Ohshio, N. Ishii, O. Kanauchi, Exp. Gerontol. 111 (2018) 10–16.
[13] K. Jounai, T. Sugimura, Y. Morita, K. Ohshio, D. Fujiwara, Int. Immunopharmacol. 56 (2018) 205–211.
[14] R. Tsuji, T. Fujii, Y. Nakamura, K. Yazawa, O. Kanauchi, J. Infect. Dis. 220 (2019) 892–901.
[15] H. Suzuki, R. Tsuji, M. Sugamata, N. Yamamoto, N. Yamamoto, O. Kanauchi, Int. J. Mol. Med. 43 (2019) 426–434.
[16] T. Sugimura, K. Jounai, K. Ohshio, H. Suzuki, T. Kirisako, Y. Sugihara, D. Fujiwara, Int. Immunopharmacol. 58 (2018) 166–172.[17] T. Sugimura, K. Jounai, K. Ohshio, D. Fujiwara, Biosci. Biotechnol. Biochem. 83 (2019) 2140–2143.